Peru bans genetically modified organisms

Peru bans genetically modified organisms
Peru bans genetically modified organisms

One of the Corporate Stances the Dominican Sisters of Springfield, Illinois adopted in June 2004 calls for a moratorium on the planting of genetically modified organisms or GMOs until they can be proven safe. In a groundbreaking new law Peru banned genetically modified foods for 10 years. The Springfield Dominican Sisters minister in Peru in Jarpa and La Oroya and surrounding rural areas, as well as in the capital city of Lima.

The Peruvian government established on Thursday, November 15,  2012  that for ten years the import and use of living modified organisms (LMOs), otherwise known as GMOs, will not be allowed in Peru. The PERUVIAN TIMES  stated, “Besides protecting an increasing export industry of organic and native products,  the ban protects Peru’s exceptionally varied native plant species —the import and use of GM seeds for corn, for example, would eventually destroy the differentiated and multicolored species grown in the Andean region.” The Andina Peru News Agency noted, “native fish and other species in nature can be displaced by genetically modified fish or affected by excessive use of herbicides, fungicides and other chemicals.” The new Peruvian ruling takes the position that analysis of genetic material will need to be regulated by accredited laboratories to determine potential GMOs. Fines for violating the law can be up to fourteen million US Dollars.

The Sisters support a moratorium on the planting of genetically engineered organisms and until such time as this technology is proven safe, all foods containing genetically engineered ingredients should be labeled.

 

(Peru flag illustration credit to www.freeflagicons.com)

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